Emmaville Primary School

Music

Music Curriculum Overview

Music

Curriculum Drivers
 
The School’s Curriculum Drivers are reflected in our Music education:
 
Learning from the past
 
Music has been influenced by, and has influenced, the past. There are many, many types or genres of music. They can be classified by country of origin, a time in history and musical features. Western Classical Music tends to be grouped according to a time in history. During that time music was, of course, being played across the world. Each country has its history of its own local music. Due to the movement of people to different parts of the world, musical styles have been combined over time creating interlinked styles of music. Music as a form of expression and performance has had an impact on culture and fashion. Lyrics within songs have challenged ideas. The musical instruments used and the features of music can be traced back to times, places and traditions in the past. Musicians are influenced by the music they listen to. As audience, developing an awareness of the context of music enhances our appreciation and understanding of it. By looking at the song writing and compositional skills of people from the past, we can be inspired to have a go ourselves.
 
Living in the Present
 
It is known that there are many benefits of music.
 
Music helps the brain to develop
Listening to music develops cognitive abilities of memorization, sequencing, imitation, classification and the ability to pay attention. Learning to play an instrument physically develops the left side of the brain known to be involved with processing language and reasoning. It also develops vision, body awareness, and gross and fine motor skills. Those who learn a musical instrument or sing also learn to be disciplined in their training because that is the key to success. By experiencing that practice and hard work is essential to reaching their goals, children learn a very valuable life-lesson.
 
Music helps understanding of maths
Maths and music may appear very different but they are actually quite similar. When children learn rhythm, they are learning ratios, fractions and proportions.
 
Music is fun
Once children have grasped the basics of playing an instrument, they are likely to really enjoy playing it. Every song they learn to sing, or piece they learn to play, is a personal achievement.
 
Music teaches children to focus and relieves stress
Playing an instrument or being in a musical class requires total attention. Consequently, music helps to calm the mind and enhances concentration.
 
Music is a form of self-expression
As well as being a way of relieving stress, music can also help children to manage their feelings better. They learn how to express feelings through language or by physically expressing emotion whilst playing an instrument.
 
Music can boost self-confidence
By improving their abilities and achieving their goals, children can feel very satisfied and this can greatly improve their self-esteem. Taking risks and facing challenges is essential for a child in order to fully develop his or her potential.
 
Music can improve social skills
Music in school is often played in a group. Team-work skills are taught so all work together harmoniously. In order to improve a performance, attending rehearsals and practising is essential. Working towards a single goal helps to enhance social skills.
 
Music can be used to help others
Musical performance can be enjoyed by all. Children from Emmaville Primary School perform within our local community.
 
At Emmaville Primary School we listen to a different genre of music each week and we learn songs that as a community we can sing and enjoy together. Though-out their time with us, every child: - uses percussion instruments; spends a year learning to play and gets to keep their own penny whistle; spends a year learning to play and having access to a trumpet; sings as part of a choir in a competitive environment and as part of small and large-scale performances.
 
 
Preparing for the Future
 
Professor Dave Whitt says “Music shapes our identity it is perhaps, the most personal of all media. While some count down the days until the latest “Game of Thrones” episode, or speculate about the future of Rey in the new “Star Wars” trilogy, music touches us on a deeper, more emotional level. Just watch the amazing documentary “Alive Inside” (2014) to see how listening to music awakens individuals suffering from memory loss. The documentary made me realize that my entire life story is on my iPod. Its thousands of songs take me back to my childhood swimming at the local pool, Friday night high school dances, and trips across the country with my family.” Who knows how the music taught and listened to at school will impact the lives of our children. We hope that for some, it will inspire a love of music that will develop in to a career, a rewarding hobby or may in some way be used to benefit others.
 
(Elements of this information was adapted from articles found at https://www.kumon.co.uk/blog/the-benefits-of-children-learning-music/ and https://jacobsmedia.com/5-reasons-why-its-important-to-teach-popular-music-history/)